Home Blog A Fort Myers Villas Resident asks Coast Chiropractic Centers, "Knee Pain and Running – Are They Related"?

A Fort Myers Villas Resident asks Coast Chiropractic Centers, "Knee Pain and Running – Are They Related"?

Jun 22, 2021 -- Posted by : Dr.Harcourt

Knee pain is a common complaint that will affect about 30% of the general population at some point in adulthood. Since running has a reputation for causing knee pain due to “wear and tear”, the question frequently arises as to whether or not running accelerates knee problems. So, what does the current body of research say?

In a 2018 study published in The American Journal of Sports Medicine, Dr. Christopher Bramah and colleagues reported that the most frequent injuries in runners include the knee (50%), the foot (39%), and the lower leg (32%). Sounds like running is bad, right?

In a small pilot study that included six healthy runners aged 18-35, researchers analyzed blood and knee joint synovial fluid samples before a 30-minute run, immediately after their run, and after a 30-minute rest. To the surprise of the research team, the inflammatory markers that are associated with conditions like osteoarthritis (OA) were higher before the run and lower in the two timeframes following the run. This suggests running may be protective against OA.

Due to the small number of subjects tested, the authors are quick to point out that they plan to run a larger scale study and will test the inflammatory marker levels at a week or longer after running to see how long this “protection” lasts. Critics have also stated that a 30-minute run is relatively short and cite a study of marathon runners (26.2 miles, or 42.2 km) that found changes in the cartilage that could suggest the potential for injuries that persisted for three months after the marathon.

Another study compared data concerning recreational runners, competitive runners, and non-runners from several prior studies (a “meta-analysis”) and found that recreational runners had a LOWER occurrence of OA than participants in the other groups.

A study that compared 1,207 UK male soccer players vs. 4,085 men from the general population (all-around age 60) showed that soccer players were twice as likely to have knee pain (52% vs. 27%, respectively). Furthermore, approximately 28% of the soccer players vs. 12% of non-soccer players had radiographically diagnosed knee OA, and the athletes were three times more likely to have received a total knee replacement.

In summary, it appears that short distance leisurely running on healthy knees is safe and even perhaps preventive against OA. On the other hand, engaging in more high-intensity activity may increase the risk for problems with the knee. If a person has OA, walking may be the safer option, but this must be individually determined.

Research has shown that problems elsewhere in the body, such as the ankle and hips, may place added strain on the knees, which can elevate the risk for problems in that region. This is why it’s important to evaluate the whole patient when they present for care for a condition like a knee pain, as a satisfying outcome may not be achieved if contributing factors are not addressed.

So, if you are experiencing knee pain and you type in pain management near me, and you find that Coast Chiropractic Centers with Dr. Timothy Harcourt, me, comes up. 

You may wonder, what is wrong with my knee?  
Pain in the knee or pain on the knee is a problem that needs attention. Kneecap pain can be particularly annoying.

Do I have a muscle strain in the knee or neuropathic pain?
You may be worried about a torn meniscus or a Baker’s cyst or kneecap pain. 

Pain in the knee or pain on the knee is concerning for sure.  Some who may be concerned about neuropathy may be concerned if this is neuropathic pain. Many who have been diagnosed with neuropathy have been on high-dosage chemicals and wonder why their knee pain remains persistent. Pickleball, golf, and tennis are common sports to cause knee pain. Some try strong chemicals to no avail.  Some have tried applying chemical gel to the affected area with temporary relief at best.

As a last resort, some type in pain management to find relief.  Hopefully, you won’t have a torn meniscus but if you do it doesn’t mean surgery is your only option. Obviously, most want to avoid a knee replacement.  Sometimes it can be a patellar tendon irritation easily resolved with conservative non-surgical treatment. Persistent or worsening pain intensity and/or frequency necessitate a visit to see a professional before it becomes a surgical case. 

Call me, Dr. Tim Harcourt, at (239) 278-3344 and mention this article for an awesome discounted first visit to include history, exam, and adjustment or first Class IV high-intensity laser treatment.

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