Home Blog Knee Pain and Jumping Injuries, A Review By Dr. Tim Harcourt

Knee Pain and Jumping Injuries, A Review By Dr. Tim Harcourt

Jul 18, 2021 -- Posted by : Dr.Harcourt

The term “jumper’s knee” was first coined in 1973 to describe an injury to the tendon that attaches the lower (most common) to the prominence (tibial tuberosity) on the proximal shin bone (tibia) or the upper pole of the knee cap or “patella” to the quadriceps femoris muscle.

Jumper’s knee is one of the more common tendinopathies that affect up to 20% of all adult athletes in sports with frequent jumping, typically among adolescent basketball and volleyball players. Individuals who are obese or who are bow-legged or knock-kneed or whose lower limbs are unequal in length have a higher risk for jumper’s knee. Poor jumping technique can also increase the risk for this condition as can cause overtraining, especially on hard surfaces.

The disease process for jumper’s knee can be divided into four stages: 1) pain only after activity without disability; 2) pain during and after without disability; 3) prolonged pain during and after which affects function; 4) complete tendon tear that requires surgical repair.

Treatment for jumper’s knee can include: 1) reducing jumping activity;  2) icing the knee for 15-30 minutes, four to six times a day, especially after the activity; 3) a thorough exam of the hip, knee, ankle, and foot to assess joint function; 4) stretching the hamstrings, calf, quadriceps, hip flexors, gluteal (buttocks), iliotibial band, and tissues around the knee cap; 5) strengthening exercises focused on specific parts of the quadriceps (vastus medialis oblique especially) and other leg muscles; 6) ultrasound and other therapies that may help speed recovery; and 7) taping to help patellar tracking.

Doctors of chiropractic are trained to evaluate and treat the whole person and frequently treat athletic injuries. A successful treatment outcome for jumper’s knee requires both local knee care and the management of the entire lower “kinetic chain” which includes the foot, ankle, knee, hip, and pelvis.

So, if you are experiencing knee pain and you type in pain management near me, and you find that Coast Chiropractic Centers with Dr. Timothy Harcourt, me, comes up. 

You may wonder, what is wrong with my knee?  
Pain in the knee or pain on the knee is a problem that needs attention. Kneecap pain can be particularly annoying.

Do I have a muscle strain in the knee or neuropathic pain?
You may be worried about a torn meniscus or a Baker’s cyst or kneecap pain. 

Pain in the knee or pain on the knee is concerning for sure.  Some who may be concerned about neuropathy may be concerned if this is neuropathic pain. Many who have been diagnosed with neuropathy have been on high-dosage chemicals and wonder why their knee pain remains persistent. Pickleball, golf, and tennis are common sports to cause knee pain. Some try strong chemicals to no avail.  Some have tried applying chemical gel to the affected area with temporary relief at best.

As a last resort, some type in pain management to find relief.  Hopefully, you won’t have a torn meniscus but if you do it doesn’t mean surgery is your only option. Obviously, most want to avoid a knee replacement.  Sometimes it can be a patellar tendon irritation easily resolved with conservative non-surgical treatment. Persistent or worsening pain intensity and/or frequency necessitate a visit to see a professional before it becomes a surgical case. 

Call me, Dr. Tim Harcourt, at (239) 278-3344 and mention this article for an awesome discounted first visit to include history, exam, and adjustment or first Class IV high-intensity laser treatment.

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